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  • #9020
    David Webb
    Participant
    • Per Albert’s suggestion, adding the “local” frequencies commonly used in the hopes that it encourages more radio use. I’m sure there are others (chime in if I missed any), but these are the ones I hear being used the most:
    • CSS Club / AJX: 145.555
    • Soboba (some instructors use this one): 144.925
    • SDHGPA (San Diego): 144.950
    • Torrey Pines Gliderport: 151.505
    • Elsinore: 144.120

    Don’t know how everyone’s radios are mounted, but if it helps anyone, mine is mounted upside-down in the back pocket of my harness (using a speaker mic mounted on the shoulder strap).  I keep a printed list of those frequencies right next to my radio so it’s easy to punch them in (I don’t have the programming cable for my radio so I can’t add labeled memory slots – this works just as well):

    IMG_9663

    #9057
    Alan Coffield
    Participant

    If flying Lake Elsinore (HG/PG) most common 2 meter frequency is 144.120 but don’t expect a lot of the locals to be using radios. If using GA aircraft radios, the skydive center and sailplane tow operations and landings are on 122.9. Some sailplanes may be on 123.5 once clear of the airport and drop zone. Hemet based sailplanes usually are on 123.3 when clear of the airport. Hemet airport traffic is on 123.0

    Easy way to remember Elsinore 2 meter frequency is: 12×12 = 144. And then add 12 again for the decimal yielding 144.120

    #9076
    David Webb
    Participant

    Thanks Alan – added Elsinore to the list above.

    #9167
    Reavis Sutphin-Gray
    Participant

    FYI, the CSS frequency is the only one of those that is actually a simplex frequency in the Southern California band plan (Torrey is a business band USHPA frequency).

    You are likely to have interference from and interfere with repeater operation on the 144.9xx frequencies and you may interfere with operators on 144.120 without ever knowing it, since it is designated for AM, SSB & other weak signal/narrow bandwidth modes.

    Adherence it the band plan is not legally required, but is respectful of other amateur radio operators. A license is required to use any of these frequencies.

    http://www.tasma.org/TASMA-2m-Band-Plan.pdf

    Reavis – K0RSG

     

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