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  • in reply to: Who’s in favor of having a launch and landing clinic? #12080

    I’m in full agreement.  I paid Tim for a day to critique my landings.  We did a bunch of launches.  14-16?  Definitely learned some pointers from him.

     

     

    in reply to: Camping on Crestline #11830

    It isn’t allowed to camp in any random Federal park area, I don’t think.  Should the Park Rangers for SB National Forest be called?

     

     

    in reply to: Need white x picture #11587

    Thank you both.

     

    John

     

    in reply to: New Weather Station Graphs #11520

    Very readable. I like it.

    in reply to: Altitude caution advisory #11519

    The arrival is called an RNAV arrival.  We have to use RNAV to follow it.  RNAV is a combination of GPS and INS, so they can check on each other. The path accuracy of the RNAV system and the autopilot is about .05 (!) nautical miles.  Yes, it is that good.  Most pilots are not going to be hand flying on the arrival, so the path accuracy is basically dead on.  However, once cleared for a visual, then maybe hand flying, maybe landing gear down to come down faster, turn away before turning back toward ONT as in Mark’s picture.  I think you can assume no one is going to be turning toward ONT off the STAR because it is hard to come down fast enough if you shorten the path.

    ATC can turn us east at any time for spacing.

    The most objective question I think from Gary above is where do they clear us for a visual?  Any time after the dogleg at hitop I think is realistic answer.  Since the weather is good most days, it never rains in southern Ca…., most approaches are visuals, that is why the airplanes are below the altitudes and MEAs specified on the STAR.

    I think David’s path is right on. since I was sitting on the left, and I could look down and see launch, that means the airplane was in between BB and CL.

     

     

     

    in reply to: Altitude caution advisory #11504

    Jonathon pointed out something to add.  The airliners are not guaranteed to be on that particular path.  Sometimes we are vectored off path for spacing reasons, or more frequently, once you are cleared for a visual approach you can do whatever you want.  Come down quickly, veer away from the Ontario if you need more time to come down, turn directly toward Ontario if you are coming down fast enough.

    In Mark’s picture the airplane veering left is probably to give themselves more time to come down.

     

     

    in reply to: Altitude caution advisory #11489

    Dan, what do I need for my Mac to look at the KMZ file?

     

     

    in reply to: Altitude caution advisory #11451

    Thanks, Mitch, but not new.  My goal as safety director is to help the club operate as safely as possible.  There are always new pilots joining us who may not have the knowledge that you have as a 30 year HG pilot, or me as an airline pilot and a 35 year HG pilot.  These new pilots probably aren’t aware that there is a terminal arrival route directly over Crestline at altitudes that are not uncommon for us to reach.  It it those pilots I am trying to reach and provide useful information to.

    You have many years of valuable experience.  I look forward to your help in keeping our club members safe.

     

     

    in reply to: Altitude caution advisory #11418

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    in reply to: Soboba, Monday 2021/2/8 #11259

    What is an SF?

     

     

    in reply to: Discussion Quality #11179

    I know I am late to the game here, but the forum should be an extension of the LZ/club in general.

    I can show great intelligence when I am working on the car or in the attic doing HVAC work, and still frequently my wife shows even greater intelligence.  However, one day some time back in the LZ when she was waiting for me to land she told me that a group of pilots were having a very loud discussion about how F-ing rad the day was and how F-ing cool the conditions are and did you see my F-ing zoom coming in to land, etc, while there were multiple visitors with their kids in the LZ.  She was so embarrassed for the visitors she went to the car and waited.

    I tell everyone I fly with (737 flying) about hanggliding and many of them do go to the CSS website to look around, being pilots after all.  If a visitor who is potentially interested in learning to HG/PG goes to the website and sees foul language and general discord it is quite possible we have lost a new participant, especially if said newbie has a wife and kids and plans to bring his wife and kids with him so they can enjoy the activity as well.

    While I have no problem with intelligent people and even showing my intelligence, the forum and the LZ should be welcoming to non-members so that we work to bring in as many folks as possible to HG/PG.

     

     

     

    I agree David has done a great job.  I hope the members support the new safety director with the continuation of moving the club  into a safer, more professional (which I use as meaning holding a skill that garners respect of others), more enjoyable environment.

     

    Albert is exactly correct.

    Do we know who the instructor is?  What is his explanation of his student not having either membership that is required to learn and fly at AJX?

     

    in reply to: PG downwash and wing tip vortices #11033

    Very interesting.  Years ago, I was flying an Enstrom F28 doing tours of Wash DC and I crossed the river behind a 727 landing at National.  I was banked 90 degrees instantly.

    In current times, I have been violently rolled in my 737 when taking off behind an Airbus 320/321, which is not given wake turbulence separation because it “isn’t needed.”  For some reason the non-heavy Airbus produces much stronger wake turbulence than the 737 or Douglas designs.

    Another oddity, the east coast air traffic controllers are much more cognizant of separation when taking off behind a heavy than the west coast controllers.  Don’t know why that is the case.